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Archive for the ‘patient safety’ Category

Advocating – It’s Like Nailing Jello to a Tree

July 24, 2011 2 comments

(No – that’s not Dad in the photo – but this gentleman is quite representative!)

Last week I shared notes from my father’s hospital bedside as he began his recovery from back surgery.  The majority of his hospital stay was safe and successful, although we continued to have big problems managing his pain throughout.

Dad was discharged to a skilled nursing center to convalesce and begin rehab.  He’s well on the road to recovery.  We have much to be thankful for.

As mentioned previously, my work does not typically include helping individual patients with their healthcare challenges.  I write and speak on advocacy topics, but one-on-one is not how I spend my typical day… So this hospital experience with Dad was quite the eye opener.

And what I learned is that being a successful patient advocate means learning how to nail jello to a tree.  (Just picture it….)  And it raised my esteem even further (if that was possible!) of all of you who work side-by-side with patients every day.

I do not know how anyone gets out of a hospital alive without having an advocate by his or her side.  OK, I don’t think it must always be a paid, private advocate who pitches in.  A family member, or someone who knows about the necessary safety measures will be able to catch most of the smaller problems.  But I learned that for those of us who are not experienced, it is impossible to anticipate the “saves” that professional advocates perform. And the magnitude of those “saves” is what is important.  They can be life-saving.

Some examples of the ones I caught:

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Notes from the Hospital Bedside

July 18, 2011 7 comments

Dad had back surgery Friday morning.

As many of you know, I don’t ordinarily work as a patient advocate. My work is about supporting patient advocates – so I look at these kinds of experiences as opportunities to learn, and to use some of the excellent advice I’ve learned from many of you over the years.

I’m relieved to say – I haven’t had much opportunity to make a difference!  Dad’s care has been quite good.  So, as his advocate, my last 72 hours have been…. well…. boring.

But there have been a few things I have observed, and a few things I’ve learned, to share with you. And two “saves” that may have been important – although – I prefer to hope they made no difference. More about that in a moment.

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What Do Your Patient Clients Expect from You?

June 12, 2011 1 comment

Ilene Corina is a long-time patient safety advocate who often sits by patients’ bedsides in hospitals to keep them safe during their hospital stays.

A recent blog post of hers asks the question: when a patient or caregiver hires a patient advocate, what do happens if, despite everyone’s best efforts, the outcomes are negative?

Of course, the answer depends on a number of factors, including the fact that not all advocate services are cut and dried and easy to define.

Further, I have to think that sometimes an advocate is hired with one set of expectations, as understood by the advocate and perhaps even recorded on paper.  However I think it’s entirely possible that even though the words say one thing, the patient’s hopes, and unspoken expectations may be something else.

That can be a danger zone for an advocate. Here are some examples:

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And Now a Word for Patients….

Last week we recognized Private Professional Patient Advocates Week, and across the country, some great stories showed up in newspapers, on TV, online and in radio broadcasts sharing stories of patients and caregivers who have been helped and the advocates who have helped them.

Some of the stories, both reviewed last week and over the past few years, are amazing – high end cancer protocols that were never mentioned by physicians, but were brought to patients by their advocates.  Complementary therapies, and wellness strategies that patients feel have been useful to them.  Thousands of dollars … Read more…

Who Deserves a Patient Advocate’s Help?

February 14, 2011 2 comments

I’ve wrestled with this question more than once.  It’s the question raised on occasion by those who talk about universal healthcare, and a for-profit healthcare system.  It’s a question asked by those who are concerned that not everyone in the United States has access to healthcare.  It’s asked by almost anyone who asks me what I do for a living.

The question is, “Doesn’t providing private patient advocacy services only to those who can afford them, just create one more division between the “haves” and the “have nots?”

Lots of soul searching, and more than a few conversations have produced the definitive answer to that question.  The answer is:

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Why Can’t Patients Be Their Own Advocates?

November 24, 2010 2 comments

Imagine… you suffer chest pains and are swept off to the ER. The pain meds leave you too groggy to make good decisions. Who will help you?

Or… difficult symptoms result in a diagnosis that leaves you stunned. You leave the doctor’s office remembering very little of what you’ve been told. Now you aren’t even sure what to do next.

Or… you’ve begun to find it confusing to keep track of all your medications. You’re concerned you’ll make a mistake. Which ones are you supposed to take with food?  Or on an empty stomach?  What about having that glass of wine at dinner – will it affect the medicines you are taking?

Next week you’ll be admitted to the hospital for knee surgery.  You have friends who have acquired infections from surgeries – one even died.  You can’t advocate for yourself when you’re drugged and in pain… who will sit by your bedside to keep you safe?

Your loved ones live too far away to be much help.  Sometimes you just need a ride to an appointment, or someone to run to the pharmacy to pick up your prescription.

These are just a few of many scenarios that require us to find some assistance to be sure we get the best care and stay safe.  Whether you have a debilitating disease, a new diagnosis, or you just feel so lousy that you can’t think straight – it’s time to call in a patient advocate to help you.

New patient advocates often find themselves having to explain what they can do to help a patient that a patient or caregiver can’t handle him or herself.  Depending on the circumstances, having a patient advocate by your side can actually make – or break – your ability to heal, or even just cope.

Can you think of other scenarios that require a professional private patient advocate?  Why not share them in the comments!

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