Archive

Archive for the ‘doctors / physicians’ Category

Watching the Headlines for Opportunities

January 8, 2012 1 comment

A link on Twitter precipitated today’s post and idea for you.  It contains a challenge, too!  See below.

The tweet linked to a news article: A second set of eyes cuts errors at HCMC.  It tells about an initiative at Hennepin County Medical Center (Minneapolis) that cut the medication errors found in patients’ discharge paperwork from 92 percent – to zero. 0.  Nada. No medication errors.  Impressive.

Now, if you or your patient-client happens to be discharged from Hennepin County Medical Center, that’s great news.

But the article got me wondering – what about the other 99.999 percent of discharged hospital patients in the world?  How many other hospitals have such horrendously dangerous medication error rates in the discharge paperwork given to their departing patients?

And then an a-ha moment…  Read more…

Advertisements

What’s Next?

October 17, 2011 Leave a comment

Two weeks ago, I worked with the staff at a large, local primary care practice teaching them some basic customer service-type skills to help them better manage their patients and, truthfully, improve their own job satisfaction, too.  Nurses, receptionists, the referral group, billing and cashiers – clinical and non-clinical staff attended. From making lists of the things their patients complain about most (you guessed it – prolonged time in the waiting room), to determining what the benefits to managing things differently might be (fewer headaches for everyone), we arrived at some simple and no-cost approaches they could use.

Their assignment, then, was to begin implementing some of those ideas, to assess what did, or did not work, and to begin thinking themselves of ways they could improve that constant patient interface that can become so problematic for everyone.

Then, after ten days of practice, we came back together to debrief.

Now, I’ll admit… I was a little nervous.  I had no idea what to expect. Had it worked?  Did they actually implement some of our ideas?  And if they did, what was their assessment of success?

Turns out….

Read more…

Patient Advocates and HIPAA

June 27, 2011 2 comments

Lately I’ve run into questions and discussions about patient advocates or navigators and HIPAA , so it seems a good topic for today’s post.

I’ll begin with a disclaimer:  there’s no one on this green planet that can give you ALL the answers as they relate to HIPAA!  No, not even the lawyers who live it every day.  It’s complex and daunting.  But there are some basics that might be useful.  I’ve learned about them in my work and writing for patients.

Here are the basics that can be useful to advocates:

1.  It’s HIPAA, not HIPPA.  HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act.  Notice, it doesn’t say anything about information (which is what it’s really about), nor does it say anything about patients.

2.  HIPAA was originally  intended to protect patient information from falling into the “wrong” hands electronically.  The laws were passed in the 1990s as fax machines were being used more and more and the Internet was beginning to be used to share personal information. HIPAA was intended to address any sort of electronic sharing of records.

Read more…

Improving Patient Relationships – What I Told the Providers

To say my trek to Alaska was overwhelmingly positive wouldn’t begin to touch the real experience.  Alaska itself was glaciers, salmon, midnight sun, king crab legs, and learning that in Fairbanks everyone has an extension cord popping out the front of their cars, so they can plug them in during the winter to keep the engine and oil from freezing. Who knew?

But the most fulfilling experience was working with the people who attended the workshops I taught.  Warm, open, receptive, fun, willing to participate and learn, they were doctors, nurse practitioners, nurses, nurse educators, dieticians, pharmacists, a psychiatrist, front desk people, techs of all flavors – you name it, they were there.

Since this invitation to speak to providers first came along last February, I have looked forward to the opportunity with excitement – and a bit of apprehension.  I’ve often stated my own disapproval of doctors who write books to tell patients how to be smart patients. I consider it to be a bit like the doctor-foxes telling us chicken-patients how to behave in the hen house.

So it was a little unnerving to realize that, in effect, I was doing almost the same thing – being the patient-fox telling the provider chickens how to behave in THEIR hen house!  But my apprehension was unfounded.  I was well received – even embraced.

The topic:  Improving Patient Relationships.  The basis:  The health systems in Alaska are mostly government-based.  A large percentage of the residents are either military, or military veterans, or native Alaskans who get free healthcare – many of whom have a sense of entitlement and little patience for a system that isn’t ready to serve them at the very moment they want to be served in the very manner they want to be served.  It won’t surprise you to learn that there is a lot of frustration to go around.  The goal:  to provide tools to these providers to help them serve their patients better by improving the relationships they develop.

Read more…

Doctor Recommendations – Do You? Should You?

January 22, 2011 3 comments

I was more than a little surprised in a conversation this week with an advocate who is not (yet) a member of AdvoConnection.  OK. That’s putting it mildly. I was actually stunned.

“Why do people feel well served by you?” I asked him.

“Because I have a beeline into all the good doctors,” he replied.  And when I asked him to explain further, he said it was because he knew the best doctors to recommend.

[Pause. Letting that sink in…]

In conversations with both long-time advocates, and lawyers, too… and honestly – what makes common sense – is that a patient advocate should never make a recommendation about a doctor.

Here’s why:

Read more…