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Got Business? AdvoConnection One Day Business Institute – Reserve Your Spot Now

September 12, 2011 Leave a comment

Most members of AdvoConnection are aware of the upcoming Business Institute, but for those of you who aren’t members – you are invited, too!

The cost to attend goes up this week, so this is the time to make your commitment.

Topics will include legal, insurance, marketing, tools, money and certification.  Here are some of the questions we will answer:

• Do you have the right insurance at the best price?
• What forms do you need and what makes your contracts legally binding?
• What’s the latest on certification issues?
• How can you deal with business problems your client poses, like not paying his bill, or refusing to sign important paperwork?
• Does your website put your best foot forward?
• What’s the best approach to social media marketing?
• How can you best price your services?
• How should you approach clients about payment?
• What does the IRS expect from you?
• What are some inexpensive ways to reach the right potential clients?
• What other types of services might you be able to offer?
• Who else is out there to help you improve and grow your business?

We’ll have plenty of opportunities for networking, too – including speed dating! (sort of…..)

And – a very special surprise guest will provide our keynote speech.  Join us – because there won’t be a dry eye in the place.

We do hope you can join us!  Thursday, November 3 in Berkeley, CA.

Learn more – and register here:  www.AdvoConnectionConference.com 

(I look forward to meeting you!)

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The Option of Saying “NO”

August 15, 2011 1 comment

Several months ago I wrote about the tendency of big-hearted advocates to over-extend themselves with volunteer work; that when someone needs their help, but doesn’t have the means to pay them, they don’t know how to say “no.” We looked at some of the ways to get past that inability in order to keep our businesses moving forward.

Truth is, that is only one of the circumstances where “no” is the right answer.  That’s true whether it is us, as professional advocacy business owners who must choose to say no, or whether we must help our clients choose “no” if it is possibly the right answer for them.

The business “no” is not unusual and will seem very simple once you understand it.

But the client “no” is often overlooked – and you truly owe it to your clients to not only understand it, but to help them understand, and sometimes embrace it, too.

Here’s a business “no” example:

Read more…

YOMs – and That Sense of Entitlement

July 31, 2011 3 comments

It arrived in my email a few days ago – a demand for a reply.

It came from a person who reads my articles at About.com.  She had sent me a question the day before regarding  trouble she was having getting copies of her records from her doctor. I had not yet responded to that email.

The second one arrived, shouting in capital letters:  WHY DIDN’T YOU ANSWER MY QUESTION?  I SENT IT YESTERDAY AND YOU HAVEN’T ANSWERED IT YET!

…………………………………..

Read the rest of this post at:

http://advoconnectionblog.com/2011/07/31/yoms-and-that-sense-of-entitlement/

Advocating – It’s Like Nailing Jello to a Tree

July 24, 2011 2 comments

(No – that’s not Dad in the photo – but this gentleman is quite representative!)

Last week I shared notes from my father’s hospital bedside as he began his recovery from back surgery.  The majority of his hospital stay was safe and successful, although we continued to have big problems managing his pain throughout.

Dad was discharged to a skilled nursing center to convalesce and begin rehab.  He’s well on the road to recovery.  We have much to be thankful for.

As mentioned previously, my work does not typically include helping individual patients with their healthcare challenges.  I write and speak on advocacy topics, but one-on-one is not how I spend my typical day… So this hospital experience with Dad was quite the eye opener.

And what I learned is that being a successful patient advocate means learning how to nail jello to a tree.  (Just picture it….)  And it raised my esteem even further (if that was possible!) of all of you who work side-by-side with patients every day.

I do not know how anyone gets out of a hospital alive without having an advocate by his or her side.  OK, I don’t think it must always be a paid, private advocate who pitches in.  A family member, or someone who knows about the necessary safety measures will be able to catch most of the smaller problems.  But I learned that for those of us who are not experienced, it is impossible to anticipate the “saves” that professional advocates perform. And the magnitude of those “saves” is what is important.  They can be life-saving.

Some examples of the ones I caught:

Read more…

Patient Advocates and HIPAA

June 27, 2011 2 comments

Lately I’ve run into questions and discussions about patient advocates or navigators and HIPAA , so it seems a good topic for today’s post.

I’ll begin with a disclaimer:  there’s no one on this green planet that can give you ALL the answers as they relate to HIPAA!  No, not even the lawyers who live it every day.  It’s complex and daunting.  But there are some basics that might be useful.  I’ve learned about them in my work and writing for patients.

Here are the basics that can be useful to advocates:

1.  It’s HIPAA, not HIPPA.  HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act.  Notice, it doesn’t say anything about information (which is what it’s really about), nor does it say anything about patients.

2.  HIPAA was originally  intended to protect patient information from falling into the “wrong” hands electronically.  The laws were passed in the 1990s as fax machines were being used more and more and the Internet was beginning to be used to share personal information. HIPAA was intended to address any sort of electronic sharing of records.

Read more…

What Do Your Patient Clients Expect from You?

June 12, 2011 1 comment

Ilene Corina is a long-time patient safety advocate who often sits by patients’ bedsides in hospitals to keep them safe during their hospital stays.

A recent blog post of hers asks the question: when a patient or caregiver hires a patient advocate, what do happens if, despite everyone’s best efforts, the outcomes are negative?

Of course, the answer depends on a number of factors, including the fact that not all advocate services are cut and dried and easy to define.

Further, I have to think that sometimes an advocate is hired with one set of expectations, as understood by the advocate and perhaps even recorded on paper.  However I think it’s entirely possible that even though the words say one thing, the patient’s hopes, and unspoken expectations may be something else.

That can be a danger zone for an advocate. Here are some examples:

Read more…

Need to No – Giving Too Much

One of my favorite things about patient advocates and navigators is that they are very generous, kind and giving people. They figure out what needs to be done, and they step up to the plate to do it.

But one of my frustrations with patient advocates is that some are too generous, too kind, too giving.  Too many have never learned where to draw limits, how to assess when they’ve taken on too much, or are in danger of taking on too much. They just don’t know how or when they “need to (say) no.”

Conversations with two AdvoConnection members remind me of this.  And it’s worth sharing with you because it may give you the kick in the backside needed to learn to say no when you know you should.  Sometime before you begin dropping all those balls you’re juggling.

One case is an advocate who I will call Molly.  (We have no members named Molly, so don’t try to figure out who I’m talking about!)  She lamented the fact that she just didn’t have enough work, and was worried about keeping her business afloat – yet – she told me how busy she was with clients. I finally figured out that all those clients were people she was helping for free.  They needed help, they could not afford to pay her, so she just began helping them anyway.

How very generous!  Remarkably generous, really.  And I applaud her for that – except – in effect, she was volunteering her way right out of business.  All her time was being spent helping those folks for free, instead of doing marketing, making phone calls, drumming up some speaking opportunities – tasks that could help bring in paying business.

Not to mention the level of stress  (and loss of sleep) when we are not only overworked, but worried that business isn’t going well.

“But,” you say. “Those people need help too!”  And I agree.  But there needs to be a point where you realize that if you spend your time working for free, and don’t stick to building your business, you will go out of business.  At that point, you can’t help anyone all.  No one. Not on a paid basis OR on a volunteer basis, because you will have to go out and get a job that will make up the difference. It’s not worth it.

The solution?

Read more…