Archive

Archive for July, 2011

YOMs – and That Sense of Entitlement

July 31, 2011 3 comments

It arrived in my email a few days ago – a demand for a reply.

It came from a person who reads my articles at About.com.  She had sent me a question the day before regarding  trouble she was having getting copies of her records from her doctor. I had not yet responded to that email.

The second one arrived, shouting in capital letters:  WHY DIDN’T YOU ANSWER MY QUESTION?  I SENT IT YESTERDAY AND YOU HAVEN’T ANSWERED IT YET!

…………………………………..

Read the rest of this post at:

http://advoconnectionblog.com/2011/07/31/yoms-and-that-sense-of-entitlement/

Advertisements

Advocating – It’s Like Nailing Jello to a Tree

July 24, 2011 2 comments

(No – that’s not Dad in the photo – but this gentleman is quite representative!)

Last week I shared notes from my father’s hospital bedside as he began his recovery from back surgery.  The majority of his hospital stay was safe and successful, although we continued to have big problems managing his pain throughout.

Dad was discharged to a skilled nursing center to convalesce and begin rehab.  He’s well on the road to recovery.  We have much to be thankful for.

As mentioned previously, my work does not typically include helping individual patients with their healthcare challenges.  I write and speak on advocacy topics, but one-on-one is not how I spend my typical day… So this hospital experience with Dad was quite the eye opener.

And what I learned is that being a successful patient advocate means learning how to nail jello to a tree.  (Just picture it….)  And it raised my esteem even further (if that was possible!) of all of you who work side-by-side with patients every day.

I do not know how anyone gets out of a hospital alive without having an advocate by his or her side.  OK, I don’t think it must always be a paid, private advocate who pitches in.  A family member, or someone who knows about the necessary safety measures will be able to catch most of the smaller problems.  But I learned that for those of us who are not experienced, it is impossible to anticipate the “saves” that professional advocates perform. And the magnitude of those “saves” is what is important.  They can be life-saving.

Some examples of the ones I caught:

Read more…

Notes from the Hospital Bedside

July 18, 2011 7 comments

Dad had back surgery Friday morning.

As many of you know, I don’t ordinarily work as a patient advocate. My work is about supporting patient advocates – so I look at these kinds of experiences as opportunities to learn, and to use some of the excellent advice I’ve learned from many of you over the years.

I’m relieved to say – I haven’t had much opportunity to make a difference!  Dad’s care has been quite good.  So, as his advocate, my last 72 hours have been…. well…. boring.

But there have been a few things I have observed, and a few things I’ve learned, to share with you. And two “saves” that may have been important – although – I prefer to hope they made no difference. More about that in a moment.

Read more…

Using Advocacy Specialties to Create Niches

When I glance at the many topics our AdvoConnection members post about in the Forum, I find certain people posting on certain kinds of topics.  That leads me to believe that they have special interests – or expertise – in those topics….

Which leads me to thinking that the patients and caregivers who are hiring them have interest in those topics, too.

So why not use them in marketing?

For example:

  • One such topic has developed around interest in integrative approaches to care.  At least one of the health advocacy educational programs was developed to focus strictly on integrative care.  A handful of our member advocates have taken coursework, or have otherwise developed special interests in integrative care – and I know from questions that come to me from patients that they are interested in integrative care, too. Read more…